Category Archives: tools

Building your own power tools: an Example

Using ZnLogEvents and GT Tools to look at HTTP traffic behind Monticello.

I love it when a plan comes together. Many small usability changes were added to GT Tools since they were included in Pharo 4. And a lot of small custom inspector presentations were added.

  http://youtu.be/rIBbeMdFCys  (be sure to select the 720p version)

This short screencast shows how to use ZnLogEvents and GT Tools in Pharo 4 to look at the HTTP traffic behing Monticello (more specifically, an MCSmalltalkhubRepository). This demonstrates how simple custom inspectors are combined to form a powerful tool - and how easy it is to learn about what is going on inside Pharo or inside your complex business app

Sven
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Network latency analysis with Pharo

Lionel Morino from the University of Bern announced his work on understanding network latency!
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Here is his announce!
Hi All,

I have been working on a visualisation of latency on a network. I found an interesting dataset with latency information of 140 cities around the world.
In the visualisation I show different metrics regarding latency such as from each city which other has the best/worst latency; cities that geographically are close but have high latency; far cities that have low latency; and average latency for each city.
When visualising the worst latency for each city I found that, for this network (at least), Valencia and in a minor extent Nairobi represent the worst endpoint for connections (in terms of latency). Also in the visualisation of far cities with low latency, Newmarket in Canada and Toledo in Spain concentrate the best endpoint for connections coming from Europe and North-America respectively.
Here there is a screencast:
If you want to load the code:
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Gofer new smalltalkhubUser: ‘merino’
        project: ‘NetworkLatency’;
        package: ‘ConfigurationOfNetworkLatency’;
        load.
(ConfigurationOfNetworkLatency project version: ‘0.1’) load.
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=–=-=-=-=
To execute the visualisation:
NLVisualise new open
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I would be glad to have your comments and suggestions.
Best regards,
Leonel Merino

Datatable support for Seaside

Esteban Maringolo announced the support of datatables.net for Seaside.
Here is his announce. 

Hi folks,

This mail is just a heads-up to anybody already using DataTables
(https://datatables.net/) or that developed a Seaside wrapper for it.
I just uploaded my initial working version of DataTables to STHub. If
your current wrapper is better than mine we can merge our efforts.

This initial version supports the basic features to instantiate a
DataTables jQuery object, plus support for AJAX+JSON responses and
also Server-side Processing
(https://datatables.net/manual/server-side).

I still have to write a proper example of how to use it, but if you
load the DataTables-Magritte package it will include a
DTMagritteReport that you can use to replace the "stock" MAReport.

Once I have time I'll try to set up an example to show the different
ways it can be used. Meanwhile look at the DTMagritteReport class to
see a particular use case. It includes support for server side sorting
(multiple columns), filtering, pagination, search.

To load it with all the dependencies run:

Gofer it
  smalltalkhubUser: 'emaringolo' project: 'DataTables';
  package: 'ConfigurationOfDataTables';
  load.

(Smalltalk at: #ConfigurationOfDataTables)project development load: 'Magritte'.

The STHub is:
http://smalltalkhub.com/#!/~emaringolo/DataTables/

Regards!

Pointer Detective

Ben Coman proposed a new pointer analysis tool :)

greetings all, I had an itch to scratch... I find it difficult using the tree list of the standard Pointer Explorer to track down why objects aren't garbage collected. I always fear I'm not going to notice getting caught in a reference loop. So I created a tool presenting an alternative view as a directed graph. The graph incrementally builds out from the target object as you explore it. Nodes are colourised to help manage complexity. The attached snapshot is produced from evaluating the following Workspace script... testObject := 'END5'. ref1 := { testObject. nil }. ref2 := { ref1 }. ref3 := PDTestResource new heldObject: ref2. ref1 at: 2 put: ref3. "note the reference loop this creates" PointerDetective openOn: testObject. Now I expect I'm duplicating something done before, but I couldn't find anything quickly and it was an opportunity for some goal direct learning of Morphic. Thanks to Roassal an option for a spring-force layout is provided. That code was copied rather than create a dependency, and might need to be rationalized later. The code is a bit rough from hacking around learning how to make things work, but its functional, so its time to get it out in the open. For more information please refer to the repository home page... http://smalltalkhub.com/#!/~BenComan/PointerDetective cheers -ben
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